Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Feng Shui... believe it or not

Four leaf clovers, wishbones, rabbit's feet, and shooting stars are so 1900's. It appears that now it is "in" to practice Feng Shui. I'll give you a moment to Google that in case you've never seen that word before, which is exactly where I was three months ago when I saw the word on the flyer advertising the home we were considering buying and then did in fact buy. What is Feng Shui? Feng Shui is an ancient art and science developed over 3,000 years ago in China (Ancient Chinese Secret, eh?) "Feng" means "wind" and "shui" means "water" (pronounced fung-shway). In Chinese culture gentle wind and clear water have always been associated with good harvest and good health, thus "good feng shui" came to mean good livelihood and fortune, while "bad feng shui" came to mean hardship and misfortune. It's a very complex art and since I don't believe in its principals, I'm only addressing it here because it shows up in various ways in my home. According to those who practice Feng Shui, simple things like paint colors, crystals, mirror placement, goldfish, and fountains can affect the "flow of energy" that brings one health, happiness, and prosperity. I found out that bedroom mirrors are a no-no, as are plants in the bathroom. Dried flowers anywhere in the home bring misfortune. Furniture placement is critical to allow for the positive flow of Qi throughout the home. Qi, (pronounced chee) is the Chinese word used to describe "the natural energy of the Universe." Fountain placement and water flow is also important. The previous owners of this home were also the builders and placed a fish pond/fountain in front of the home during the initial construction. They actually tore it out and rebuilt it two years later because the initial pond had the water flowing AWAY from the house instead of toward it. This supposedly affects prosperity, and evidently forces your corporate qi off the Fortune Cookie 500. Below is the a photo of the fountain and one of the three resident goldfish frolicking in the pond below it. According to proper Feng Shui practice, we should have eight fish to ensure us the ultimate in prosperity. Yeah, I definitely need to make a trip to WalleyeMart (hee!)





I do believe in mood enhancing. I think subtle lighting, candles, soothing room colors, soft sounds (music waterfall, ocean waves, etc.) can all be used to produce a calming effect on our senses. However, when I read this:

The three-legged frog is considered very lucky. It usually has one or three coins in its mouth. The position of the three-legged frog with a coin in its mouth, is very important. It is to be placed anywhere near your main door on the inside and it should look inwards, as if it has just entered your house with the money ! Do not ever place this frog with the coin facing, i.e. looking at your main door, as this symbolizes money going out of the house.

and this:

Many people love reading books and they also take pride in possessing them. The habit, per se, is very good. But books, when kept in open shelves create shar chi or 'killing breath' which is bad for the occupant of the room. Open book shelves whether in the office or in the home are like knives, which give out negative energy and is bad Feng Shui. The best way to correct this is by having doors, on all the shelves. Keep the shelves covered and not exposed. This will reduce the bad effects of the open shelves.

I immediately labeled Feng Shui as bullshit. Superstitious and pagan-like practices of the paranoid. Just my two cents.

This is a picture of a stain-glassed window inserted into the wall directly ahead of you as you walk in through the front door. I haven't been able to establish its significance in the Feng Shuit practice, but I'm sure it has to do with colors and light welcoming qi into the home for a nice cup of tea. What ev.



2 comments:

Nanan said...

that little fish does look lonely....

Jerome De Leon said...

I also believe in Feng Shui. It won't hurt to believe right? I even hired a feng shui master to help me with this.